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Found 3 results

  1. Hi all, I received a land-line phone call this afternoon from a man with a very heavy accent from India clamming he was a representative for a company (the company name was never mentioned) that offered extended technical assistance for consumers for a yearly fee that Microsoft employs. He claimed that the company was no longer solvent and was about to go out of business so they were offering refunds to participants in the program as a stipulation in the bankruptcy proceedings. Sounds all well & good, right? First of all I have no such agreement with any company nor did I pay for anything like that. Of course I knew this was a bogus call but still played along just to see what would transpire next, as if I didn't know already! He claimed that he could mail me a check (no actual amount was ever quoted) or it would be "so much easier and quicker" if I just let them deposit the sum into my bank's checking account. Asking the bank name, address and my account number which, of course, I didn't divulge. After that I sarcastically said to him, "I bet your family is real proud of you that you turned out to be a criminal" and hung up the phone so happy to have wasted his time, lol! Most people wouldn't fall for this but there are still enough innocently unsuspecting or down right greedy individuals out there to make it worth their while to make this type of scam viable unfortunately. Those are the folks they're trying to make contact with.
  2. It's tax season once again and with the new tax laws in place this is causing confusion among some consumers. So of course scammers are all to eager to take advantage of this situation. Here's an informative article by The Associated Press about this tax phone scam. More than 20,000 taxpayers have been targeted by fake Internal Revenue Service agents in the largest phone scam the agency has ever seen, the IRS inspector general said Thursday. Thousands of victims have lost a total of more than $1 million. As part of the scam, fake IRS agents call taxpayers, claim they owe taxes, and demand payment using a prepaid debit card or a wire transfer. Those who refuse are threatened with arrest, deportation or loss of a business or driver's license, said J. Russell George, Treasury inspector general for tax administration. Real IRS agents usually contact people first by mail, George said. And they don't demand payment by debit card, credit card or wire transfer. The inspector general's office started receiving complaints about the scam in August. Immigrants were the primary target early on, the IG's office said. But the scam has since become more widespread. Tax scams often escalate during filing season, George said. People have been targeted in nearly every state. "This is the largest scam of its kind that we have ever seen," George said in a statement. "The increasing number of people receiving these unsolicited calls from individuals who fraudulently claim to represent the IRS is alarming." The script is similar in many calls, leading investigators to believe they are connected. The inspector general's office is working with major phone carriers to try to track the origins of the calls, the IG's office said. The scam has been effective in part because the fake agents mask their caller ID, making it look like the call is coming from the IRS, George said. In some cases, fake agents know the last four digits of Social Security numbers, and follow up with official-looking emails.
  3. There's a growing number of people who have reported receiving a phone call where the other person says "can you hear me" or something similar. If you answer "yes" you may have already fallen victim to one of the fastest growing phone scams currently in the U.S. This scam has hit close to home actually. Local law enforcement agencys are "urging residents" to just hang up if they receive a call like that! Here's a great news story from NBC Business News about the subject and steps to take to minimize those really annoying robocalls too. http://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/tips-fighting-can-you-hear-me-now-other-robocalls-n714331 Regards, Ritchie...
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